Category: bilbo

l-o-t-r:

“If I had been familiar with some of those movies I think I might have been less keen to join the band. But I think that making “Lord of the Rings” was an act of faith for a lot of people. The minute I got there I knew it was going to be all right. Ian Holm arrived he said, “What’s it like? Is it going to be all right?” And I said, “You won’t want to leave.” And a month later he said, “I don’t want to leave! I want to stay!”

Ian McKellen talks about early jitters filming LOTR Trilogy

tolkienmatters:

Smaug was a fire drake from the North and the last great worm known in Middle Earth. His origins are obscure, it is speculated that he is descended from the many dragons of the War of Wrath, though significantly smaller. He conquered Erebor from the dwarves and laid waste to the neighboring trade city of Dale, inhabited by Men. He was drawn to Erebor from the wastes of the North for the great treasures it held. He reigned as King Under the Mountain for nearly two centuries, sleeping on the gems and gold he conquered which formed a protective armor on his soft underbelly. Thorin Oakenshield led a company to reclaim Erebor, as he was it’s rightful heir, with them came Bilbo Baggins the company burglar. As Bilbo attempted to steal back the treasures of Erebor he was discovered by Smaug, interrogated following a game of riddles, and narrowly escaped with his life, but with valuable information about a weak point in Smaug’s nearly impenetrable scale and gem armor. In a rage of suspicion Smaug believed that the men of Laketown, refugees of Dale, were behind Thorin’s attempt at usurping him, and flew out to destroy them. Though information of his weakness passed through a thrush bird, who sent this information to Bard the Bowman, descendant of Lord Girion of Dale. Bard led a company of archers in defense of Laketown and slew Smaug; armed with this vital knowledge and a Black Arrow, an heirloom of his family. Smaug’s destruction allowed for the reconstruction of Dale and left the riches of Erebor up for grabs, which caused plenty more headache.

“Never laugh at live dragons, Bilbo you fool!“ he said to himself, and it became a favorite saying of his later, and passed into a proverb.” – Bilbo Baggins, The Hobbit, Inside Information

Indeed Bilbo found he had lost more than spoons – he had lost his reputation. It is true that for ever after he remained an elf-friend, and had the honour of dwarves, wizards, and all such folk as ever passed that way; but he was no longer quite respectable. He was in fact held by all the hobbits of the neighbourhood to be ‘queer’-except by his nephews and nieces on the Took side, but even they were not encouraged in their friendship by their elders. I am sorry to say he did not mind. He was quite content; and the sound of the kettle on his hearth was ever after more musical than it had been even in the quiet days before the Unexpected Party. His sword he hung over the mantelpiece. His coat of mail was arranged on a stand in the hall (until he lent it to a Museum). His gold and silver was largely spent in presents, both useful and extravagant – which to a certain extent accounts for the affection of his nephews and his nieces. His magic ring he kept a great secret, for he chiefly used it when unpleasant callers came. He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves; and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said “Poor old Baggins!” and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy to the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long.

There were rockets like a flight of scintillating birds singing with sweet voices. There were green trees with trunks of dark smoke: their leaves opened like a whole spring unfolding in a moment, and their shining branches dropped glowing flowers down upon the astonished hobbits, disappearing with a sweet scent just before they touched their upturned faces. There were fountains of butterflies that flew glittering into the trees; there were pillars of coloured fires that rose and turned into eagles, or sailing ships, or a phalanx of flying swans; there was a red thunderstorm and a shower of yellow rain; there was a forest of silver spears that sprang suddenly into the air with a yell like an embattled army, and came down again into the Water with a hiss like a hundred hot snakes. And there was also one last surprise, in honour of Bilbo, and it startled the hobbits exceedingly, as Gandalf intended. The lights went out. A great smoke went up. It shaped itself like a mountain seen in the distance, and began to glow at the summit. It spouted green and scarlet flames. Out flew a red-golden dragon – not life-size, but terribly life-like: fire came from his jaws, his eyes glared down; there was a roar, and he whizzed three times over the heads of the crowd. They all ducked, and many fell flat on their faces. The dragon passed like an express train, turned a somersault, and burst over Bywater with a deafening explosion.

‘Ah!’ said Sam gloomily. ‘We’ll just wait long enough for winter to come.’

‘That can’t be helped,’ said Bilbo. ‘It’s your fault partly, Frodo my lad: insisting on waiting for my birthday. A funny way of honouring it, I can’t help thinking. Not the day I should have chosen for letting the S.-B.s into Bag End. But there it is: you can’t wait now fill spring; and you can’t go till the reports come back.

‘When winter first begins to bite
and stones crack in the frosty night,
when pools are black and trees are bare,
’tis evil in the Wild to fare.’

But that I am afraid will be just your luck.’ 
‘I am afraid it will,’ said Gandalf.

tolkienmatters:

“All that the unsuspecting Bilbo saw that morning was an old man with a staff. He had a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, a silver scarf over which a white beard hung down below his waist, and immense black boots. “Good morning!” said Bilbo, and he meant it. The sun was shining, and the grass was very green. But Gandalf looked at him from under long bushy eyebrows that stuck out further than the brim of his shady hat. “What do you mean?” be said. “Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is morning to be good on?” “All of them at once,” said Bilbo.”

— Gandalf’s arrival at Bag End, ready to ruin Bilbo’s day. The Hobbit, An Unexpected Party.

tolkienmatters:

“Gil-galad was an elven king.
Of him the harpers sadly sing:
the last whose realm was fair and free
between the Mountains and the Sea. His sword was long, his lance was keen, his shining helm afar was seen;
the countless stars of heaven’s field
were mirrored in his silver shield. But long ago he rode away,
and where he dwelleth none can say;
for into darkness fell his star
in Mordor, where the shadows are.”

— Spoken by Samwise Gamgee on Weathertop, part of the Lay of Gil-galad. Samwise learned it from Bilbo Baggins who possibly translated it into common tongue from elvish during his stay in Rivendell. The Lay speaks of Gil-galad’s death during the Siege of Barad-dûr

Photo

Sing all ye joyful, now sing all together?
The winds in the free-top, the winds in the heather;
The stars are in blossom, the moon is in flower,
And bright are the windows of Night in her tower.

Dance all ye joyful, now dance all together!
Soft is the grass, and let foot be like feather!
The river is silver, the shadows are fleeting;
Merry is May-time, and merry our meeting.

Sing we now softly, and dreams let us weave him!
Wind him in slumber and there let us leave him!
The wanderer sleepeth. Now soft be his pillow!
Lullaby! Lullaby! Alder and Willow!

Sigh no more Pine, till the wind of the morn!
Fall Moon! Dark be the land!
Hush! Hush! Oak, Ash, and Thorn!
Hushed be all water, till dawn is at hand!

All that the unsuspecting Bilbo saw that morning was an old man with a staff. He had a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, a silver scarf over which a white beard hung down below his waist, and immense black boots. “Good morning!” said Bilbo, and he meant it. The sun was shining, and the grass was very green. But Gandalf looked at him from under long bushy eyebrows that stuck out further than the brim of his shady hat. “What do you mean?” be said. “Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is morning to be good on?”

“All of them at once,” said Bilbo.