Category: fotr

For the Elves the world moves, and it moves both very swift and very slow. Swift, because they themselves change little, and all else fleets by: it is a grief to them. Slow, because they do not count the running years, not for themselves. The passing seasons are but ripples ever repeated in the long long stream. Yet beneath the Sun all things must wear to an end at last.’
`But the wearing is slow in Lórien,’ said Frodo. `The power of the Lady is on it. Rich are the hours, though short they seem, in Caras Galadhon, where Galadriel wields the Elven-ring.‘

‘Give us that, Déagol, my love,” said Sméagol, over his friend’s shoulder.

‘“Why?” said Déagol.

‘ “Because it’s my birthday, my love, and I wants it,” said Sméagol.

‘“I don’t care,” said Déagol. “I have given you a present already, more than I could afford. I found this, and I’m going to keep it.”

‘ “Oh, are you indeed, my love,” said Sméagol; and he caught Déagol by the throat and strangled him, because the gold looked so bright and beautiful. Then he put the ring on his finger.

There were rockets like a flight of scintillating birds singing with sweet voices. There were green trees with trunks of dark smoke: their leaves opened like a whole spring unfolding in a moment, and their shining branches dropped glowing flowers down upon the astonished hobbits, disappearing with a sweet scent just before they touched their upturned faces. There were fountains of butterflies that flew glittering into the trees; there were pillars of coloured fires that rose and turned into eagles, or sailing ships, or a phalanx of flying swans; there was a red thunderstorm and a shower of yellow rain; there was a forest of silver spears that sprang suddenly into the air with a yell like an embattled army, and came down again into the Water with a hiss like a hundred hot snakes. And there was also one last surprise, in honour of Bilbo, and it startled the hobbits exceedingly, as Gandalf intended. The lights went out. A great smoke went up. It shaped itself like a mountain seen in the distance, and began to glow at the summit. It spouted green and scarlet flames. Out flew a red-golden dragon – not life-size, but terribly life-like: fire came from his jaws, his eyes glared down; there was a roar, and he whizzed three times over the heads of the crowd. They all ducked, and many fell flat on their faces. The dragon passed like an express train, turned a somersault, and burst over Bywater with a deafening explosion.

‘Ah!’ said Sam gloomily. ‘We’ll just wait long enough for winter to come.’

‘That can’t be helped,’ said Bilbo. ‘It’s your fault partly, Frodo my lad: insisting on waiting for my birthday. A funny way of honouring it, I can’t help thinking. Not the day I should have chosen for letting the S.-B.s into Bag End. But there it is: you can’t wait now fill spring; and you can’t go till the reports come back.

‘When winter first begins to bite
and stones crack in the frosty night,
when pools are black and trees are bare,
’tis evil in the Wild to fare.’

But that I am afraid will be just your luck.’ 
‘I am afraid it will,’ said Gandalf.

‘For mithril,’ answered Gandalf. `The wealth of Moria was not in gold and jewels, the toys of the Dwarves; nor in iron, their servant. Such things they found here, it is true, especially iron; but they did not need to delve for them: all things that they desired they could obtain in traffic. For here alone in the world was found Moria-silver, or true-silver as some have called it: mithril is the Elvish name. The Dwarves have a name which they do not tell. Its worth was ten times that of gold, and now it is beyond price; for little is left above ground, and even the Orcs dare not delve here for it. The lodes lead away north towards Caradhras, and down to darkness. The Dwarves tell no tale; but even as mithril was the foundation of their wealth, so also it was their destruction: they delved too greedily and too deep, and disturbed that from which they fled, Durin’s Bane. Of what they brought to light the Orcs have gathered nearly all, and given it in tribute to Sauron, who covets it.

At that moment Elrond came out with Gandalf, and he called the Company to him. ‘This is my last word,’ he said in a low voice. ‘The Ring-bearer is setting out on the Quest of Mount Doom. On him alone is any charge laid: neither to cast away the Ring, nor to deliver it to any servant of the Enemy nor indeed to let any handle it, save members of the Company and the Council, and only then in gravest need. The others go with him as free companions, to help him on his way. You may tarry, or come back, or turn aside into other paths, as chance allows. The further you go, the less easy will it be to withdraw; yet no oath or bond is laid on you to go further than you will. For you do not yet know the strength of your hearts, and you cannot foresee what each may meet upon the road.’

`Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens,’ said Gimli.

‘Maybe,’ said Elrond, `but let him not vow to walk in the dark, who has not seen the nightfall.’

‘Yet sworn word may strengthen quaking heart,’ said Gimli.

`Or break it,’ said Elrond. `Look not too far ahead! But go now with good hearts! Farewell, and may the blessing of Elves and Men and all Free Folk go with you. May the stars shine upon your faces!’

tolkienmatters:

“Gil-galad was an elven king.
Of him the harpers sadly sing:
the last whose realm was fair and free
between the Mountains and the Sea. His sword was long, his lance was keen, his shining helm afar was seen;
the countless stars of heaven’s field
were mirrored in his silver shield. But long ago he rode away,
and where he dwelleth none can say;
for into darkness fell his star
in Mordor, where the shadows are.”

— Spoken by Samwise Gamgee on Weathertop, part of the Lay of Gil-galad. Samwise learned it from Bilbo Baggins who possibly translated it into common tongue from elvish during his stay in Rivendell. The Lay speaks of Gil-galad’s death during the Siege of Barad-dûr

tolkienmatters:

Argonath, Sindarin for the “Royal Stones”, was a large monument of the Numenorean kings Isildur and Anarion. They guard the river Anduin, just before opening into Nen Hitheol, a large lake. Constructed by Isildur and Anarion who jointly ruled as kings of Gondor. They both wore crowns and held axes. The statues mark the northern border of Gondor’s kingdom, though without practical use they were to show the majesty of Gondor. No significant event passed the Argonath save the Fellowship’s journey, but it surely spooked numerous orcs. Peter Jackson’s movies did not portray Anarion but in his place Elendil.

“As Frodo was borne toward them the great pillars rose like towers to meet him. Giants they seemed to him, vast grey figures silent but threatening. Then he saw that they were indeed shaped and fashioned: the craft and power of old had wrought upon them, and still they preserved through the suns and rains of forgotten years the mighty likenesses in which they had been hewn.” – Frodo upon seeing Argonath, Fellowship of the Ring, The Great River.

tolkienmatters:

“Gil-galad was an elven king.
Of him the harpers sadly sing:
the last whose realm was fair and free
between the Mountains and the Sea. His sword was long, his lance was keen, his shining helm afar was seen;
the countless stars of heaven’s field
were mirrored in his silver shield. But long ago he rode away,
and where he dwelleth none can say;
for into darkness fell his star
in Mordor, where the shadows are.”

— Spoken by Samwise Gamgee on Weathertop, part of the Lay of Gil-galad. Samwise learned it from Bilbo Baggins who possibly translated it into common tongue from elvish during his stay in Rivendell. The Lay speaks of Gil-galad’s death during the Siege of Barad-dûr

tolkienmatters:

The Doors of Durin are the western gate of Moria, built in the Second Age during a time of friendship between the Elves of Hollin (Eregion in Sindarin) and the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm. This gate was built for the Elves of Hollin, since the main gates are in the East in the Dimrill Dale. The door blends into the rock wall, save for the mithril edging, called Ithildin, which can only be seen under starlight or moonlight. The anvil, crown, and bright star are the symbols of Durin. The stars are the Stars of

Fëanor. The trees are the “trees of the High Elves” referring to either Holly trees (Of Hollin), or the Two Trees of Valinor. The C and N in the top corners are the creator’s first initials. The writing on the door states in “Feanorian characters”, which would entail an older version of Tengwar; “Ennyn Durin Aran Moria. Pedo mellon a Minno. Im Narvi hain echant. Celebrimbor o Eregion tethant. I thiw hin”. Which is Sindarin for “The Doors of Durin, Lord of Moria. Speak, friend, and enter. I, Narvi, made them. Celebrimbor of Hollin drew these signs.”. Narvi was dwarven smith. Celebrimbor was a Noldor of Hollin who also crafted the Rings of Power (Not the One Ring). The gate remained open during times of peace, but Sauron’s first war on Middle Earth caused the gate to be closed. Hollin was entirely destroyed during the War of Elves and Sauron. Moria was abandoned because of the Balrog’s emergence. The door remained shut for most of the Third Age, It was referenced when the Dwarves who sought to reclaim Moria attempted to escape, upon exiting the door however Óin was slain by the Watcher In The Water, and the remainder were trapped and slain. The Fellowship of the Ring arrived at the door in an effort to bypass Saruman’s gaze by going through Moria. Gandalf initially forgot the password, but thanks to Merry’s hobbit curiosity regarding the riddle it was solved. The password to open the door is the Sindarin word for friend, “mellon”. The doors were blockaded with rubble by the Watcher In The Water following the Fellowship’s entrance.

“The Moon now shone upon the grey face of the rock; but they could see nothing else for a while. Then slowly on the surface where the wizard’s hands had passed, faint lines appeared, like slender veins of silver running in the stone. At first they were no more than pale gossamer-threads, so fine that they only twinkled fitfully where the Moon caught them, but steadily they grew broader and clearer, until their design could be guessed.” – Gandalf upon discovering the Door. Fellowship of the Ring, A Journey In The Dark