Category: frodo

frodo-sam:

I hear it’s going to be a party of special magnificence.

robin-buckleys:

endless gifs of frodo baggins ~  13/∞

For the Elves the world moves, and it moves both very swift and very slow. Swift, because they themselves change little, and all else fleets by: it is a grief to them. Slow, because they do not count the running years, not for themselves. The passing seasons are but ripples ever repeated in the long long stream. Yet beneath the Sun all things must wear to an end at last.’
`But the wearing is slow in Lórien,’ said Frodo. `The power of the Lady is on it. Rich are the hours, though short they seem, in Caras Galadhon, where Galadriel wields the Elven-ring.‘

But fear no more! I would not take this thing, if it lay by the highway. Not were Minas Tirith falling in ruin and I alone could save her, so, using the weapon of the Dark Lord for her good and my glory. No. I do not wish for such triumphs, Frodo son of Drogo.‘

l-o-t-r:

“Confound it all, Samwise Gamgee. Have you been eavesdropping?”

Photo

The Grey Havens (Sindarin: Mithlond) was a major
Elvish city in Eriador, on the coast of Lindon. Founded at the beginning of the
Second Age by elves who survived the War of Wrath, the city is noted for being
the primary port from Middle-Earth to Valinor.

Círdan

The
Shipwright was the lord of the Havens and Lindon after Gil-Galad’s death, Círdan ruled throughout
the Third and Fourth Ages. Notable people who came to Middle Earth through
Mithlond include the first Númenóreans, The Istari (Gandalf received the ring
of Narya from Círdan when he arrived), and the Gondorian fleet that fought
Angmar during the Angmar’s conquest of Arnor. The port was the biggest emigration
point for Elves leaving Middle Earth for Valinor. After the War of the Ring the
Last Riding of the Keepers of the Rings occurred, where Elrond, Galadriel,
Bilbo, Frodo, and most of the remaining High Elves went to the Havens and
sailed to Valinor. In the Fourth Age the Last Ship left from the Grey
Havens, which carried

Círdan

and
Celeborn. The Grey Havens never fell to siege or violence, and had an almost
religious significance to the Elves, as it was their final sight of Middle
Earth before they passed into the Blessed Realm.

“‘Well, here at last, dear friends, on the
shores of the Sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-earth. Go in peace!
I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.’

Then Frodo kissed Merry and
Pippin, and last of all Sam, and went aboard; and the sails were drawn up, and
the wind blew, and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth; and
the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore glimmered and was lost. And
the ship went out into the High Sea and passed on into the West, until at last
on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the
sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in
his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver
glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far
green country under a swift sunrise.”

– Gandalf saying goodbye as him and Frodo board the ship to go West. Samwise, Pippin, and Merry had gone with them to say goodbye. Of the remaining Hobbits Samwise would eventually cross the sea, as he had been a ringbearer, albeit briefly. Return of the King, The Grey Havens.

Indeed Bilbo found he had lost more than spoons – he had lost his reputation. It is true that for ever after he remained an elf-friend, and had the honour of dwarves, wizards, and all such folk as ever passed that way; but he was no longer quite respectable. He was in fact held by all the hobbits of the neighbourhood to be ‘queer’-except by his nephews and nieces on the Took side, but even they were not encouraged in their friendship by their elders. I am sorry to say he did not mind. He was quite content; and the sound of the kettle on his hearth was ever after more musical than it had been even in the quiet days before the Unexpected Party. His sword he hung over the mantelpiece. His coat of mail was arranged on a stand in the hall (until he lent it to a Museum). His gold and silver was largely spent in presents, both useful and extravagant – which to a certain extent accounts for the affection of his nephews and his nieces. His magic ring he kept a great secret, for he chiefly used it when unpleasant callers came. He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves; and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said “Poor old Baggins!” and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy to the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long.

The Dead Marshes were a large swampland outside of The Black Gate in the Dagorlad plains. It is here that many great battles were fought, battles that scarred the area and created a wasteland. The name comes from the Battle of Dagorlad during the end of the 2nd Age. The Last Alliance of Men and Elves marched on Mordor to destroy Sauron, and succeeded at great cost. Over several months the casualites included Oropher and Amdír, Silvan Elves who disregarded Gil-Galad’s orders and became trapped and virtually destroyed by Mordor’s armies. Thranduil, Oropher’s son, returned with the Mirkwood with a third of his army. Most of Amdír’s host died in the marshes. The marshes were also the site of Gondor’s battles against the Easterlings in the middle of the Third Age. King Ondoher’s army was routed in the marshes, and the Gondor Captain Eärnil II destroyed the Wainrider army in the same war and area during the Battle of the Camp. A millennium later during the Quest of the Ring Frodo, Sam, and Gollum crossed the marshes to reach Mordor. Gollum tells them of the “candles of corpses” that haunt the marshes and lure wanderers into the water. Under the surface of the water the dead of past battles can be seen, which entranced Frodo and almost claimed him. The dead under the water may have been illusions or the results of dark magic. Tolkien has said that “The Dead Marshes and the approaches to the Morannon owe something to Northern France after the Battle of the Somme. They owe more to William Morris and his Huns and Romans.” (Letter to Professor L. W. Forster, 12/31/1960, Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien). The Somme Offensive was a battle during the First World War notorious for being one of the bloodiest battles in recorded history, a battle that Professor Tolkien had served in. William Morris’ fantasy writing had recurring themes of warfare and the supernatural, notably in A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark.

“‘I don’t know,’ said Frodo in a dreamlike voice. ‘But I have seen them too. In the pools when the candles were lit. They lie in all the pools, pale faces, deep deep under the dark water. I saw them: grim faces and evil, and noble faces and sad. Many faces proud and fair, and weeds in their silver hair. But all foul, all rotting, all dead. A fell light is in them.’ Frodo hid his eyes in his hands. ‘I know not who they are; but I thought I saw there Men and Elves, and Orcs beside them.’

”`Yes, yes,’ said Gollum. `All dead, all rotten. Elves and Men and Orcs. The Dead Marshes. There was a great battle long ago, yes, so they told him when Sméagol was young, when I was young before the Precious came. It was a great battle. Tall Men with long swords, and terrible Elves, and Orcses shrieking. They fought on the plain for days and months at the Black Gates. But the Marshes have grown since then, swallowed up the graves; always creeping, creeping.’

‘But that is an age and more ago,’ said Sam. ‘The Dead can’t be really there! Is it some devilry hatched in the Dark Land? ’

`Who knows? Sméagol doesn’t know,’ answered Gollum. ‘You cannot reach them, you cannot touch them. We tried once, yes, precious. I tried once; but you cannot reach them. Only shapes to see, perhaps, not to touch. No precious! All dead.’

Sam looked darkly at him and shuddered again, thinking that he guessed why Sméagol had tried to touch them.’“

– Frodo, Sam and Gollum passing through the Dead Marshes. Two Towers, The Passage of the Marshes.

The Dead Marshes were a large swampland outside of The Black Gate in the Dagorlad plains. It is here that many great battles were fought, battles that scarred the area and created a wasteland. The name comes from the Battle of Dagorlad during the end of the 2nd Age. The Last Alliance of Men and Elves marched on Mordor to destroy Sauron, and succeeded at great cost. Over several months the casualites included Oropher and Amdír, Silvan Elves who disregarded Gil-Galad’s orders and became trapped and virtually destroyed by Mordor’s armies. Thranduil, Oropher’s son, returned with the Mirkwood with a third of his army. Most of Amdír’s host died in the marshes. The marshes were also the site of Gondor’s battles against the Easterlings in the middle of the Third Age. King Ondoher’s army was routed in the marshes, and the Gondor Captain Eärnil II destroyed the Wainrider army in the same war and area during the Battle of the Camp. A millennium later during the Quest of the Ring Frodo, Sam, and Gollum crossed the marshes to reach Mordor. Gollum tells them of the “candles of corpses” that haunt the marshes and lure wanderers into the water. Under the surface of the water the dead of past battles can be seen, which entranced Frodo and almost claimed him. The dead under the water may have been illusions or the results of dark magic. Tolkien has said that “The Dead Marshes and the approaches to the Morannon owe something to Northern France after the Battle of the Somme. They owe more to William Morris and his Huns and Romans.” (Letter to Professor L. W. Forster, 12/31/1960, Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien). The Somme Offensive was a battle during the First World War notorious for being one of the bloodiest battles in recorded history, a battle that Professor Tolkien had served in. William Morris’ fantasy writing had recurring themes of warfare and the supernatural, notably in A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark.

“‘I don’t know,’ said Frodo in a dreamlike voice. ‘But I have seen them too. In the pools when the candles were lit. They lie in all the pools, pale faces, deep deep under the dark water. I saw them: grim faces and evil, and noble faces and sad. Many faces proud and fair, and weeds in their silver hair. But all foul, all rotting, all dead. A fell light is in them.’ Frodo hid his eyes in his hands. ‘I know not who they are; but I thought I saw there Men and Elves, and Orcs beside them.’

”`Yes, yes,’ said Gollum. `All dead, all rotten. Elves and Men and Orcs. The Dead Marshes. There was a great battle long ago, yes, so they told him when Sméagol was young, when I was young before the Precious came. It was a great battle. Tall Men with long swords, and terrible Elves, and Orcses shrieking. They fought on the plain for days and months at the Black Gates. But the Marshes have grown since then, swallowed up the graves; always creeping, creeping.’

‘But that is an age and more ago,’ said Sam. ‘The Dead can’t be really there! Is it some devilry hatched in the Dark Land? ’

`Who knows? Sméagol doesn’t know,’ answered Gollum. ‘You cannot reach them, you cannot touch them. We tried once, yes, precious. I tried once; but you cannot reach them. Only shapes to see, perhaps, not to touch. No precious! All dead.’

Sam looked darkly at him and shuddered again, thinking that he guessed why Sméagol had tried to touch them.’“

– Frodo, Sam and Gollum passing through the Dead Marshes. Two Towers, The Passage of the Marshes.