Category: sam

l-o-t-r:

Sam: “Captain Faramir, you have shown your quality, sir – the very highest.”
Faramir: “The Shire must truly be a great realm, Master Gamgee, where gardeners are held in high honor.”

l-o-t-r:

“Confound it all, Samwise Gamgee. Have you been eavesdropping?”

Photo

frodo-sam:

How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad has happened? But in the end, it’s only a passing thing this shadow, even darkness must pass.

The Dead Marshes were a large swampland outside of The Black Gate in the Dagorlad plains. It is here that many great battles were fought, battles that scarred the area and created a wasteland. The name comes from the Battle of Dagorlad during the end of the 2nd Age. The Last Alliance of Men and Elves marched on Mordor to destroy Sauron, and succeeded at great cost. Over several months the casualites included Oropher and Amdír, Silvan Elves who disregarded Gil-Galad’s orders and became trapped and virtually destroyed by Mordor’s armies. Thranduil, Oropher’s son, returned with the Mirkwood with a third of his army. Most of Amdír’s host died in the marshes. The marshes were also the site of Gondor’s battles against the Easterlings in the middle of the Third Age. King Ondoher’s army was routed in the marshes, and the Gondor Captain Eärnil II destroyed the Wainrider army in the same war and area during the Battle of the Camp. A millennium later during the Quest of the Ring Frodo, Sam, and Gollum crossed the marshes to reach Mordor. Gollum tells them of the “candles of corpses” that haunt the marshes and lure wanderers into the water. Under the surface of the water the dead of past battles can be seen, which entranced Frodo and almost claimed him. The dead under the water may have been illusions or the results of dark magic. Tolkien has said that “The Dead Marshes and the approaches to the Morannon owe something to Northern France after the Battle of the Somme. They owe more to William Morris and his Huns and Romans.” (Letter to Professor L. W. Forster, 12/31/1960, Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien). The Somme Offensive was a battle during the First World War notorious for being one of the bloodiest battles in recorded history, a battle that Professor Tolkien had served in. William Morris’ fantasy writing had recurring themes of warfare and the supernatural, notably in A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark.

“‘I don’t know,’ said Frodo in a dreamlike voice. ‘But I have seen them too. In the pools when the candles were lit. They lie in all the pools, pale faces, deep deep under the dark water. I saw them: grim faces and evil, and noble faces and sad. Many faces proud and fair, and weeds in their silver hair. But all foul, all rotting, all dead. A fell light is in them.’ Frodo hid his eyes in his hands. ‘I know not who they are; but I thought I saw there Men and Elves, and Orcs beside them.’

”`Yes, yes,’ said Gollum. `All dead, all rotten. Elves and Men and Orcs. The Dead Marshes. There was a great battle long ago, yes, so they told him when Sméagol was young, when I was young before the Precious came. It was a great battle. Tall Men with long swords, and terrible Elves, and Orcses shrieking. They fought on the plain for days and months at the Black Gates. But the Marshes have grown since then, swallowed up the graves; always creeping, creeping.’

‘But that is an age and more ago,’ said Sam. ‘The Dead can’t be really there! Is it some devilry hatched in the Dark Land? ’

`Who knows? Sméagol doesn’t know,’ answered Gollum. ‘You cannot reach them, you cannot touch them. We tried once, yes, precious. I tried once; but you cannot reach them. Only shapes to see, perhaps, not to touch. No precious! All dead.’

Sam looked darkly at him and shuddered again, thinking that he guessed why Sméagol had tried to touch them.’“

– Frodo, Sam and Gollum passing through the Dead Marshes. Two Towers, The Passage of the Marshes.

The Dead Marshes were a large swampland outside of The Black Gate in the Dagorlad plains. It is here that many great battles were fought, battles that scarred the area and created a wasteland. The name comes from the Battle of Dagorlad during the end of the 2nd Age. The Last Alliance of Men and Elves marched on Mordor to destroy Sauron, and succeeded at great cost. Over several months the casualites included Oropher and Amdír, Silvan Elves who disregarded Gil-Galad’s orders and became trapped and virtually destroyed by Mordor’s armies. Thranduil, Oropher’s son, returned with the Mirkwood with a third of his army. Most of Amdír’s host died in the marshes. The marshes were also the site of Gondor’s battles against the Easterlings in the middle of the Third Age. King Ondoher’s army was routed in the marshes, and the Gondor Captain Eärnil II destroyed the Wainrider army in the same war and area during the Battle of the Camp. A millennium later during the Quest of the Ring Frodo, Sam, and Gollum crossed the marshes to reach Mordor. Gollum tells them of the “candles of corpses” that haunt the marshes and lure wanderers into the water. Under the surface of the water the dead of past battles can be seen, which entranced Frodo and almost claimed him. The dead under the water may have been illusions or the results of dark magic. Tolkien has said that “The Dead Marshes and the approaches to the Morannon owe something to Northern France after the Battle of the Somme. They owe more to William Morris and his Huns and Romans.” (Letter to Professor L. W. Forster, 12/31/1960, Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien). The Somme Offensive was a battle during the First World War notorious for being one of the bloodiest battles in recorded history, a battle that Professor Tolkien had served in. William Morris’ fantasy writing had recurring themes of warfare and the supernatural, notably in A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark.

“‘I don’t know,’ said Frodo in a dreamlike voice. ‘But I have seen them too. In the pools when the candles were lit. They lie in all the pools, pale faces, deep deep under the dark water. I saw them: grim faces and evil, and noble faces and sad. Many faces proud and fair, and weeds in their silver hair. But all foul, all rotting, all dead. A fell light is in them.’ Frodo hid his eyes in his hands. ‘I know not who they are; but I thought I saw there Men and Elves, and Orcs beside them.’

”`Yes, yes,’ said Gollum. `All dead, all rotten. Elves and Men and Orcs. The Dead Marshes. There was a great battle long ago, yes, so they told him when Sméagol was young, when I was young before the Precious came. It was a great battle. Tall Men with long swords, and terrible Elves, and Orcses shrieking. They fought on the plain for days and months at the Black Gates. But the Marshes have grown since then, swallowed up the graves; always creeping, creeping.’

‘But that is an age and more ago,’ said Sam. ‘The Dead can’t be really there! Is it some devilry hatched in the Dark Land? ’

`Who knows? Sméagol doesn’t know,’ answered Gollum. ‘You cannot reach them, you cannot touch them. We tried once, yes, precious. I tried once; but you cannot reach them. Only shapes to see, perhaps, not to touch. No precious! All dead.’

Sam looked darkly at him and shuddered again, thinking that he guessed why Sméagol had tried to touch them.’“

– Frodo, Sam and Gollum passing through the Dead Marshes. Two Towers, The Passage of the Marshes.

davineclaire:

“I wonder if we’ll ever be put into songs or tales. I wonder if people will ever say, ‘Let’s hear about Frodo and the Ring.’ And they’ll say ‘Yes,that’s one of my favorite stories. Frodo was really courageous, wasn’t he, Dad?’ ‘Yes, my boy, the most famousest of hobbits. And that’s saying a lot,’”

“You’ve left out one of the chief characters – Samwise the Brave. I want to hear more about Sam.”

THE LORD OF THE RINGS: TWO TOWERS (2002, dir. Peter Jackson)

tolkienmatters:

Oliphaunts, also known as “Mûmakil” in Harad (plural of mûmak), were large creatures similar to elephants. They are from Far Harad. They were tamed by the Haradrim and used for war. Strapping siege towers on the back of these elephants and launching darts and spears from there. They were presumably used during the wars with Gondor over Umbar, but were extensively used during the War of the Ring. First seen by Frodo and Sam in Ithilien marching to Mordor. They were also used during the Battle of Pelennor Fields. Often considered a myth in the West, the hobbits were very surprised to see such beasts, and Sam sang a poem of them, presumably learned from a Shire folk tale.

“Grey as a mouse,
Big as a house,
Nose like a snake,
I make the earth shake,
As I tramp through the grass;
Trees crack as I pass.
With horns in my mouth
I walk in the South,
Flapping big ears.
Beyond count of years
I stump round and round,
Never lie on the ground,
Not even to die.
Oliphaunt am I,
Biggest of all,
Huge, old, and tall.
If ever you’d met me
You wouldn’t forget me.
If you never do,
You won’t think I’m true;
But old Oliphaunt am I,
And I never lie.” 

– Samwise Gamgee in Ithilien, Two Towers, The Black Gate is Closed.

thorinds:

“Oh yes we could! Spoiling nice fish!”

thorinds:

“Then Frodo kissed Merry and Pippin, and last of all Sam, and went aboard; and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew, and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth; and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore glimmered and was lost. And the ship went out into the High Sea and passed on into the West, until at last on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.”